Titanic News

Current news and events about the RMS Titanic, including exhibitions, artefacts, films and documentaries and historical information about the Titanic

Human remains possibly found in Titanic shipwreck

The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

AP

The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

Human remains may be embedded in the mud of the North Atlantic where the New York-bound Titanic came to rest when it sank 100 years ago, a federal official said Saturday.

A 2004 photograph, released to the public for the first time this week in an uncropped version to coincide with the disaster’s centenary, shows a coat and boots in the mud at the legendary shipwreck site.

“These are not shoes that fell out neatly from somebody’s bag right next to each other,” James Delgado, the director of maritime heritage at the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration, told The Associated Press in a phone interview.

PHOTOS: LOOKING BACK 100 YEARS LATER: THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC

The way they are “laid out” makes a “compelling case” that it is where “someone has come to rest,” he said.

The image, along with two others showing pairs of boots resting next to each other, were taken during an expedition led by NOAA and famed Titanic finder Robert Ballard in 2004. They were published in Ballard’s book on the expedition. Delgado said the one showing a coat and boots was cropped to show only a boot.

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AP

Filmmaker James Cameron, who has visited the wreck 33 times, has said he has seen “zero human remains” during his extensive explorations of the Titanic.

The New York Times first reported about the photographs in Saturday editions.

Filmmaker James Cameron, who has visited the wreck 33 times, told the newspaper that he had seen “zero human remains” during his extensive explorations of the Titanic. “We’ve seen shoes. We’ve seen pairs of shoes, which would strongly suggest there was a body there at one point. But we’ve never seen any human remains.”

For Delgado, who was the chief scientist on an expedition in 2010 that mapped the entire site, the difference in opinion is “one of semantics.”


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/human-remains-possibly-found-titanic-shipwreck-article-1.1061974#ixzz1sAX7cuMI

200,000 Titanic-related records are published online

Titanic Titanic leaving Southampton on its maiden voyage

 

More than 200,000 records relating to the Titanic have been published online to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the ship's sinking on 15 April.

The documents provide information about survivors and the 1,500 people who died, including a number of wills and hundreds of coroner inquest files.

The collection has been gathered by the subscription-based family history website Ancestry.co.uk.

However, access to the Titanic records collection is free until 31 May 2012.

The Titanic, which was built in Belfast, sank in the Atlantic Ocean after hitting an iceberg during its maiden voyage to New York.

The records include the ship's official passenger list, which shows the names, ages and occupations of those on board the ill-fated liner.

It also details the nationalities, positions and addresses of the ship's crew which had more than 900 members.

'Tragic'

The last will and testament of Titanic's captain, Edward J Smith, is among the documents which can be accessed online.

Captain Edward John Smith The will of Edward John Smith is included in the online collection

The wills of wealthy American businessmen Benjamin Guggenheim and John Jacob Astor can also be viewed on the site.

All three men lost their lives in the disaster.

Members of the public can search through more than 329 coroner inquest files and records of the 330 bodies that were recovered at sea.

Titanic wreck to gain UNESCO protection

Titanic wreck to gain UNESCO protection

Updated April 06, 2012 12:01:16

The wreck of the Titanic will this month come under UNESCO protection, as it has now been lying at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean for 100 years.

The British liner sank in international waters and so comes under no state's protection but, after a century, wrecks fall under the jurisdiction of a 2009 UN Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage.

"From now on, state parties to the convention can outlaw the destruction, pillage, sale and dispersal of objects found at the site," UNESCO said, in a statement from its Paris headquarters.

"They can take all possible measures within their power to protect the wreck and ensure that the human remains there are treated with dignity."

The passenger liner hit an iceberg on its maiden voyage across the Atlantic, sinking to almost 4,000 metres in waters off Newfoundland on the night of April 14, 1912, with the loss of 1,514 people on board.

It was and remains one of the worst peacetime shipping disasters in history, and this year's anniversary is being marked by several cultural and historical events in Britain and the United States, its intended destination.

The wreck was rediscovered in 1985 thanks to advances in submarine technology, and historic artefacts have since been recovered.

"The sinking of the Titanic is anchored in the memory of humanity and I am pleased that this site can now be protected by the UNESCO Convention," UNESCO director general Irina Bokova said.

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Two Titanic Classics: A Night to Remember and Titanic on Bluray

The sea is a fierce and cruel opponent to be decisively mastered. It's the unpredictable element; the highway for the Artie's counter-offensive against inquisitive and adventurous man. Its weapons are the iceberg and the ice-floe. Twenty tidewater glaciers along the west coast of Greenland are launching platforms for a barrage of giant icebergs that make an annual descent on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, which were among the heaviest traveled shipping lanes in the world. After calving from the glaciers the icebergs spend a winter at Melville Bay, a second winter at Cape Dier and reach the Grand Banks (1800 miles away) the following spring and summer. The danger period to shipping was from April to July, the height of the tourist season.

The public outcry at the Titanic disaster led to the institution of the International Ice Patrol, maintained by the United States Coast Guard. It was a cooperative effort of the United States and Canada on this side of the Atlantic, and seven other major maritime nations that subscribed to the International Convention for the Safety of Life At Sea. The last convention (before these films were made) were negotiated in 1948 and came up for renewal in 1960. The International Ice Patrol began operations in February each year when the iceberg calving season began. The patrol area covered an area about the size of Pennsylvania off the Grand Banks. Headquarters are at Argentia, Newfoundland, where cutters and B-17's were based and from which 24 hour patrols are carried out to sight and report bergs and ice floes. Ice reports were broadcast twice daily and listened to religiously by transatlantic steamer and air traffic. All commercial radio transmission ceased when ice information was broadcast, another result of the "Titanic" disaster, when commercial messages prevented receipt of vital information.

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Titanic: Underwhelming reviews for television drama

A scene from ITV1's Titanic The first outing of ITV1's Titanic beat the conclusion of period rival Upstairs Downstairs in the ratings

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Julian Fellowes' Titanic drama has received largely lukewarm reviews from critics after Sunday's first episode aired on ITV1.

Writing in the Daily Telegraph, Sarah Crompton said: "There was both too much and too little to concentrate on, and no-one to care about.

"If I were forced to judge Titanic on this one episode alone, I'd call it a damp squib," she continued.

The four-part drama coincides with the centenary of the liner's sinking.

Ms Crompton added: "But having seen part two, I can assure you it gets better."

It stars Linus Roache, Celia Imrie, Geraldine Somerville, Toby Jones and the newly announced Doctor Who companion, Jenna-Louise Coleman.

'Over-hyped'

The mini-series has been generating huge interest following the success of Fellowes' Downton Abbey on both sides of the Atlantic.

And it attracted a strong audience, beating the final episode of 1930s drama Upstairs Downstairs on BBC One, which aired at the same time.

Upstairs Downstairs had an average audience of 4.4 million, while Titanic's average was 7.4 million, according to overnight figures.

Times critic Andrew Billen said that he struggled with the speed of the opening episode.

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"Titanic" director makes first solo dive to Earth's deepest point

At 5:52 p.m. ET Sunday (7:52 a.m. Monday, local time), James Cameron arrived at the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep, members of the National Geographic expedition have confirmed.

His depth on arrival: 35,756 feet (10,898 meters)—a figure unattainable anywhere else in the ocean.

Reaching bottom after a 2-hour-and-36-minute descent, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker typed out welcome words for the cheering support crew waiting at the surface: "All systems OK."

Folded into a sub cockpit as cramped as any Apollo capsule, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker is now investigating a seascape more alien to humans than the moon. Cameron is only the third person to reach this Pacific Ocean valley southwest of Guam (map)—and the only one to do so solo.

Hovering in what he's called a vertical torpedo, Cameron is likely collecting data, specimens, and imagery unthinkable in 1960, when the only other explorers to reach Challenger Deep returned after seeing little more than the silt stirred up by their bathyscaphe.

After as long as six hours in the trench, Cameron—best known for creating fictional worlds on film (Avatar, Titanic, The Abyss)—is to jettison steel weights attached to the sub and shoot back to the surface. (See pictures of Cameron's sub.)

Meanwhile, the expedition's scientific support team awaits his return aboard the research ships Mermaid Sapphire and Barakuda, 7 miles (11 kilometers) up. (Video: how sound revealed that Challenger Deep is the deepest spot in the ocean.)

"We're now a band of brothers and sisters that have been through this for a while," marine biologist Doug Bartlett told National Geographic News from the ship before the dive.

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Titanic: What really happened

National GeographicTHE sinking of the Titanic was one of the 20th century's great dramas, a mystery that has confounded scientists and historians for decades.

 New photos of the ship that sank 100 years ago on April 15, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, will be published in the April edition of National Geographic Magazine for the first time giving a sense of what the wreck looks like today.

The photographs, shot by independent research group Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, provide a greater understanding of what happened on that fateful day.

The photos are the by-product of a multi-million dollar, two-month expedition that used a number of different approaches to get never-before-seen views of the wrecked ship.

For much of August and September 2010, explorers used robotic vehicles to sweep the 5km-by-8km site, scanning images that were later combined to produce the first shot below.

Side-scan and multibeam sonar was used to store the minute details of the ship and to evaluate what has changed since previous exploratory expeditions.

During these sweeps, the robots stored "ribbons" of data, with the products of the repeated attempts then collected together and observed as a whole unit.

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Belfast wagers on Titanic's unsinkable appeal

By Jill Lawless

The Titanic departs Southampton, England, on her maiden Atlantic Ocean voyage to New York in 1912.

To most of the world, the name Titanic means tragedy, spiced with romance, sacrifice and luxury. But in Belfast, where it was built, the doomed ship is a triumph of industry, enterprise and engineering.

The city hopes the rest of the world will soon see it that way, too.

Northern Ireland's capital, scarred by 30 years of Catholic-Protestant violence and mired in Europe's economic doldrums, is gambling on a gleaming new Titanic tourist attraction to bring it fame beyond the Troubles - and a renewed sense of civic pride.

Tying the city's name to a sinking ship is not, apparently, a problem.

"What happened to the Titanic was a disaster," said Tim Husbands, chief executive of Titanic Belfast, a £100 million (NZ$193.5m) visitor attraction due to open on March 31, in advance of the 100th anniversary of the ship's sinking. "But the ship wasn't."

Colin Cobb, a Titanic expert who leads walking tours of the docks and slipways where the great ship was built a century ago, puts it even more succinctly: "Tragedy plus time equals tourism."

Celebrating the ship and its builders is the aim of Titanic Belfast, a shiny new "visitor experience" - don't call it a museum - whose four prow-like wings jut jauntily skyward beside the River Lagan on the site of the former Harland and Wolff shipyard.

Titanic, then the world's largest, most luxurious ocean liner, left this spot on April 2, 1912, eight days before its maiden voyage from England to New York.

The vessel touted as "practically unsinkable" hit an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland and sank in the early hours of April 15, 1912. More than 1500 of the 2200 people on board died.

Belfast mourned - and then, for decades, kept quiet about its link to the tragedy.

"When she sank, it was a huge shock for the city," said Susie Millar, whose great-grandfather Thomas Millar was a deck engineer who perished aboard the Titanic.

"For years and years it wasn't discussed. But now, coming up to the 100th anniversary, we've rediscovered that pride in the ship and we're sharing those stories again."

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New Titanic Mini-Series from Downton Abbey Creators

Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes has finished production on a four-part miniseries called Titanic, which will premiere on ABC this April.

Let heaven and angels sing Hallelujah.

Along with virtually every other thing that is happening in April, the series' debut is set to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic.

This review of the show in the Guardian comes as close to saying the program is straight up exactly like Downton Abbey as one can come without actually saying that. In other words: look for it to be alternately frustrating and amazing and expecting you to fawn all over it when it shows up to tea wearing ugly hammer pants.

Oh, there is one twist:

In an innovative, but not entirely successful move, viewers will watch the boat begin to sink at the end of each episode, as Fellowes retells the story from different characters' viewpoints. Who survives the tragedy, however, is not revealed until the final episode.

The Guardian review notes that this effect is "sometimes confusing," but that is definitely not going to stop everyone you know from watching.

What sank the Titanic? Scientists point to the moon

A hand out image released May 19, 2003 shows a photo of the Titanic. REUTERS/Christie's  NMB/JV

By Jim Forsyth

SAN ANTONIO | Tue Mar 6, 2012 3:30pm EST

(Reuters) - A century after the Titanic disaster, scientists have found an unexpected culprit for the sinking: the moon.

Anyone who knows history or has seen the blockbuster movies knows that the cause of the transatlantic liner's accident 100 years ago next month was that it hit an iceberg.

"But the lunar connection may explain how an unusually large number of icebergs got into the path of the Titanic," said Donald Olson, a Texas State University physicist whose team of forensic astronomers examined the moon's role.

Ever since the Titanic sank in the early hours of April 15, 1912, killing 1,517 people, researchers have puzzled over Captain Edward Smith's seeming disregard of warnings that icebergs were in the area where the ship was sailing.

Smith was the most experienced captain in the White Star Line and had sailed the North Atlantic sea lanes on numerous occasions. He had been assigned to the maiden voyage of the Titanic because he was a knowledgeable and careful seaman.

 

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'Titanic' pier in Cobh could collapse if funding not found for preservation

A RANGE of events is being organised in Cobh this year to mark the centenary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic , but one of the most tangible links between the town and the historic ship is in danger of being lost.

A 19th century wooden pier in Cobh, formerly Queenstown, where 123 passengers boarded tenders taking them to the Titanic , is in a perilous state and some experts are warning that unless funding is provided the pier is likely to collapse.

Some uncertainty remains over the ownership of the pier, known locally as the Heartbreak or White Star Line pier, which was used by generations of emigrants who left Ireland from Cobh.

While the nearby White Star Line office has been renovated and turned into a visitor attraction, uncertainty remains over the future of the wooden pier.

Maritime historian Vincent McMahon says the pier is hugely significant in historical terms. “In the past, tenders always carried passengers from this pier out to large liners.

“Passengers went through the office, now the Titanic Experience, walked onto the pier and then got on to tenders and were brought out to their ships.” Mr McMahon says Cobh has been slow to preserve such an important aspect of its maritime past.

“I can never understand how this wasn’t top of the agenda for years. In Belfast they are restoring everything they can in relation to the Titanic. 

“There has been uncertainty in Cobh over whether or not the pier belonged to the White Star Line building, or to the shipping lanes. Nobody has been able to prove who owns it,” he says.

“I feel it should be retained or restored in some way, bearing in mind that in 1912 the last passenger to board the Titanic walked out over those wooden planks.”

Marc Anderson, project director of Titanic 100 Cobh, which is planning a series of commemorative events, says: “I believe that pier should be protected. I know some persons are looking into it, but as far as I know it is currently at a stalemate.

“It is a very important piece of Titanic history and a very important piece of Cobh history and it shouldn’t just be allowed fall into the water.”

At present, the pier is not on the register of protected structures and Cobh Town Council says it has no funding available to carry out any works to the pier, which could cost upwards of €350,000.

Town clerk Pádraig Lynch says the council is looking at what funding options are available.

Amazing Photos of Titanic in Color

I came across this amazing collection of colonized photos by Anton Logvynenko of Titanic and her sister ships Britannic and Olympic.  They certainly look very authentic and any keen Titanic offin should visit his site here for the entire collection in high resolution.  Great to see this kind of stuff.

100th Anniversary of Titanic to Be Marked with Special Cruises

By Jason Gallagher | Yahoo! Contributor Network – Tue, Jan 10, 2012

 

Of all the newsworthy travels in the history of the travel industry, perhaps none is as famous at the voyage of the Titanic. As USA Today reports, 2012 is a special year for Titanic because the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the colossal ship will take place on April 15. Not to let the anniversary pass without any type of notoriety, at least three separate cruises will honor the Titanic.

What cruises are scheduled for the Titanic?

The MS Balmoral will depart from Southampton, England, on April 8, and follow the exact route the Titanic followed to New York; however, as Titanicmemorialcruise.co.uk states, that particular cruise is sold out. According to the website, a mini-cruise will also depart Southampton, with stops in Liverpool and Belfast, which are two important cities to the Titanic. However, a third cruise will depart April 10 from New York, exactly 100 years after Titanic sailed from Southampton.

What activities will take place on-board?

According to MSNBC, experts will be lecturing on various Titanic topics. As the article indicates, a few of the lecturers have personal ties to Titanic. In addition, menu items that were prepared on Titanic will be served on the new cruises, as AOL Travel reports. As the MSNBC article indicates the cruises were designed to replicate the experiences of the passengers on the original Titanic. In addition, the report states 1,309 passengers will be on the MS Balmoral, which is the same number the Titanic carried.

What is taking place to honor the victims of the disaster?

The MSNBC report states both ships will make stops in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to visit the cemetery dedicated to unclaimed victims of Titanic, and both will make stops above the final resting place of the ship in the Atlantic Ocean as well. However, the article also states passengers will also be allowed to honor the memories of family members in their own way.

Are there any other Titanic related events?

The 100th anniversary of the tragedy will be marked in several different ways. According to SFGate.com, perhaps the most notable nontravel related Titanic event is the April 6 release of a 3D edition of the classic "Titanic" movie, and an auction featuring 5,000 artifacts from Titanic will also be held on April 11. Between the auction, movie and special cruises, 2012 will be a special year for family and friends of any victims or survivors of the disaster.

Jason Gallagher is a former travel professional with a decade of experience in the industry. He remains an avid traveler and hotel fan with exposure to technology and trends in properties across the United States.

Robin Gibb to honour Titanic victims in first 'classical' composition

Robin Gibb
Robin Gibb will be composing Titanic Requiem with his son as part of a series events to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the ship's sinking. Photograph: Ian West/Empics

A hundred years since the ship went down, the 1,500 victims of the Titanic disaster will receive an unlikely memorial – the first self-described classical work by Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees.

Composed with his son RJ, Titanic Requiem will be performed in London on 10 April by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra – the anniversary of the doomed ship's departure from Southampton. The event will boast a hologram show depicting the sea, the ship, and – naturally – the iceberg.

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Costa Concordia vs. Titanic: Do They Compare?

The hectic evacuation of the sinking cruise liner Costa Concordia has been compared with the likes of the disastrous Titanic disaster. In fact, Swiss survivors even told the newspaper La Tribune de Genève that Celine Dion's "My Heart Will Go On," the theme song to the 1997 film "Titanic," was playing in their dining room as the ship hit the rocks.

So how do the two shipwrecks match up? While the loss of life on the Titanic was much worse than on the Costa Concordia, even the Titanic's poorly planned evacuation may have been less chaotic than the one off the Tuscan coast. By the numbers, here's a side-by-side look at the two cruise ship disasters:

Date of wrecks: The Titanic went down on April 15, 1912. The Costa Concordia capsizedon Jan.13, 2012.

Size of ships: The Titanic was 882 feet and 8 inches long (268 meters) and had a tonnage of 46,000. The Costa Concordia was larger, with a tonnage of 114,500 and a length of 951 feet and 5 inches (290 m). The width of the Titanic was 92.5 feet (28 m), compared with 118 feet (36 m) for the Costa Concordia.

More from Live Science

Bragging rights: The Titanic was the largest ship of her day. The Costa Concordia had the largest spa center ever built on a cruise ship.

People on board: 2,201 people were aboard the Titanic when it sunk, and 4,200 were aboard the Costa Concordia.

Cause of wreck: The Titanic famously hit an iceberg on its starboard side in the middle of the North Atlantic, while the Costa Concordia struck a rock on its port side when the captain brought the ship in close to the Tuscan island of Giglio in the Mediterranean Sea.

Lifeboat capacity: The Titanic's lifeboats could have carried no more than 1,178 people. Nowadays, according to the International Maritime Organization, ships are required to have plenty of lifeboat space, with enough lifeboats hanging off the port side to accommodate half of the passengers, enough on the starboard side to accommodate the other half, and room for 25 percent more of the ship's passengers in inflatable rafts stored on board. [Titanic Quiz: Fact or Fiction?]

"The Costa Concordia had sufficient lifeboat space, as far as we know, by the regulations she operates under," said Charles Weeks, an emeritus professor of marine transportation at the Maine Maritime Academy, and a member of the Titanic International Society. Unlike the Titanic, which lacked sufficient staff at lifeboat muster points, the Costa Concordia seemed to have crew supervision at the lifeboat stations, he said. The delay in lowering the lifeboats, which occurred about 45 minutes to an hour after the ship hit the rocks, may have been the captain's call, he said.

"There may have been a perfectly valid reason why he waited so long," Weeks told LiveScience. "You don't want to put lifeboats in the water while the ship is still making way. That can be very hazardous."

Time it took to sink: The Titanic went down over a period of two hours and 40 minutes. The Costa Concordia began listing about 20 minutes after it hit a rock near Giglio Island and was completely on its side within about three hours.

Depth of the wreck: The Titanic lay on the seafloor 12,460 feet (3,798 m) below the surface. The Costa Concordia essentially ran aground and is now half-submerged — the ship is unable to float in water less than 26 feet (8 m) deep.

Temperature of water: The passengers of the Titanic unlucky enough to end up in the water likely perished in a few short minutes, as the water temperature was just 28 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 2 degrees Celsius).

According to Accuweather, the air temperature when the Costa Concordia crashed was in the mid-to-low 40s Fahrenheit. The water temperature was in the mid- to upper-50s. In 50-degree water, hypothermia sets in quickly; boating guides put the time at about 60 minutes until exhaustion or unconsciousness, with death following within three hours.

Loss of life: Only 711 of the passengers aboard the Titanic were rescued, resulting in adeath toll of 1,514, according to the British Wreck Commissioner's Inquiry. The most recent reports show 11 Costa Concordia passengers were confirmed dead, with 21 still missing.

Fate of the captain: Edward J. Smith, the captain of the Titanic, went down with his ship. His body was never found.

The Costa Concordia captain, Francesco Schettino, is under intense scrutiny for allegedly abandoning ship while passengers were still on board. A transcript of a phone conversation between Schettino and a coast guard officer reveals the officer insisting Schettino return to the ship, and the captain refusing. Schettino is now under house arrest and is being investigated for manslaughter.

The standard of the captain being the last person to leave a crippled ship serves two purposes, Weeks said. First, it's the captain's job to take care of everyone else on the boat. Second, if a captain stays with a damaged ship, he can protect the ship owner's interests. If the captain is still on the boat, the owners can arrange a towing contract to get the vessel back to port, Weeks said. If the ship is abandoned, it must be salvaged, which can be a more complicated and costly process for the owners.

Big evacuation foul-ups: Hundreds of Titanic passengers never had a chance at survival, given the lack of lifeboat space available. Not only that, but a U.S. inquiry into the disaster found that the evacuation process was a mess: There was no system for loading the boats, and many of the boats went down partially filled (though there was space for 1,176 people on the boats, only about 700 made it onto one). Additionally, the loss of life would have been much worse had the weather have been rough, the panel found. With the lifeboats suspended 70 feet (21 m) above the ocean, rough waters would have made lowering them without smashing them against the ship impossible.

On the other hand, all reports indicate very little panic during the Titanic evacuation, at least not until the very end. This is likely because most passengers didn't realize the seriousness of the situation, Weeks said. There are reports of passengers refusing to get on the lifeboats, choosing instead to stay in the warmth and light of the doomed ship.

The same cannot be said of the Costa Concordia evacuation, which survivors describe as chaotic. "It was every man for himself," one survivor told French News outlet France 24. Crew members reportedly panicked and jumped aboard lifeboats before passengers.

The Costa Concordia listed to one side, in contrast with the Titanic, which tilted forward, her bow in the water. That may have made the Concordia sinking seem more dramatic than the sinking of the Titanic, at least from the perspective of those on board.

"A ship that lists to one side is far more dramatic than a ship that trims down by the head," Weeks said.

The evacuation of the Costa Concordia was delayed, with passengers initially informed that the ship was having a minor electrical problem. There had been no evacuation drill onboard — it was scheduled for Saturday — so passengers were confused. Many of the crew did not speak Italian and could not communicate with their charges. Some cruise-goers reported being on lifeboats captained by waiters and other support staff.

Weeks said reports of the crew's behavior still needed confirmation, but said that such a situation is not without precedent. The cruise ship Oceanus, for example, sank off the South African Coast in 1991.

"The social director wound up overseeing the evacuation of the passengers," Weeks said. "The captain and certain members of the crew went off in the first lifeboat."

Cruise accident "like a scene from Titanic" says passenger

cruise ship sinks(Updated 8:10AM EDT) After running aground off the coast of Italy Friday night, an unknown number of passengers are reported dead as a luxury cruise ship sinks and dawn reveals details of the tragic accident.

"It was like a scene from the Titanic,'' journalist Mara Parmegian on board for what was to be an 8 day Mediterranean sailing told the ANSA news agency.

Costa Cruises Costa Concordia ran aground on a sand bank near the Italian island of Giglio, Italy sending water pouring in through a 160-foot gash in the hull and forcing the evacuation of over 4000 passengers and crew on the ship.

"We were having dinner aboard when we heard a loud noise, like that of the keel being dragged over something," passenger Luciano Castro told Italian state radio early Saturday reports ajc. The lights went out "and there were scenes of panic, glasses falling to the floor," Castro said.

Castro said it was reported that some passengers jumped into the sea in an attempt to swim to nearby Giglio island. Evacuation efforts were apparently complicated by the position of the listing ship, according to a Costa Cruises blog post.

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Titanic Artifacts Set for Auction in 2012, 100 Years After Shipwreck

ap titanic auction ll 111229 main Titanic Artifacts Set for Auction in 2012, 100 Years After Shipwreck

The largest collection of artifacts from the Titanic – the famous “unsinkable” ship that did just that in 1912 and went on to inspire the movie that was, until recently, the number one grossing movie of all time –  will be up for auction in 2012, the 100th anniversary of the original shipwreck.

According to the Associated Press, there are more than 5,500 items in the collection owned by RMS Titanic Inc. The collection includes fine china, ship fittings, and portions of its hull – with an estimated value of $189 million.

The auction will be held on April 1  at Guernsey’s, a New York City auction house. But the results won’t be announced until April 15 – exactly 100 years to the day after the Titanic sank on its maiden voyage from England to New York City.

More than 1,500 of the 2,228 people on board died when the Titanic struck an iceberg, causing the ship’s descent to the bottom of the ocean.

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Titanic Events in Southampton for 2012 Anniversary

Background History
At 11.40pm on the 14th April 1912 RMS Titanic struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic, near Newfoundland.
At 12.20am on the 15th April the crew was given the order to send away women and children in the ship’s lifeboats.
Titanic sank at 2.20am on the 15th April.
Of the 1523 people who lost their lives 549 came from Southampton.
The disaster, which made headlines across the world, had a devastating effect on the people of Southampton

100 years after the tragic sinking of the White Star liner RMS Titanic, the city recognises our unique link to the tragedy. The disaster struck at the heart of Southampton as hundreds of city residents went down with the fated vessel. Events across the city give you the chance to connect with the voices of the past that echo through history, telling the story of that disastrous night.


Retracing the Unsinkable: The Titanic Centenary - Southampton City Art Gallery’s Biennial Open Exhibition
17 March – 29 April 2012
All residents of Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Wiltshire and Dorset are invited to submit their artwork for this 'open exhibition.' This year the theme is the Titanic. In April 2012, it will be one hundred years since the famous White Star Line ship set off on its ill-fated voyage to America. The iceberg that intervened, the tales of heroism and the deep sea excavations of the ship embedded in the Atlantic have become legendary.
We encourage artists of all ages working in a range of media to rise to the challenge of creating a new piece of work based on this theme. The judges invite entrants to consider the brief as creatively as possible and will consider both 2-D and 3-D work in any medium (although video and multi-media work cannot, unfortunately, be accepted due to technical limitations). The successful entrants to the exhibition will have their work exhibited at Southampton City Art Gallery from 17th March – 29th April 2012.
Please contact Julia Howard for further information, entry forms and a copy of the rules; Julia.howard@southampton.gov.uk or 023 8083 2355

Southampton City Libraries Favourite Book to Share Award 2012
1 April - 30 July
Southampton’s search for this year’s best family book sets sail with the launch of Southampton’s Favourite Book to Share Award which is 'Sea' or 'Maritime' themed for 2012. The competition, which is run by Southampton City Libraries, is designed to encourage parents and carers to enjoy a good story with children under the age of five. Copies of each of the colourful tales will be available from April 1st at all of the city’s libraries, from Sea City or Tudor House Museum, along with voting slips. Staff from Library Services will also be visiting parent and toddler groups across the city to help them to check out the competition.
Parents, carers and children have until the end of July to register their vote and every entrant will qualify for the chance to win copies of all six books. To register please visit your local library or contact Siobhan McGarrigle, 023 8083 2595 or e-mail Siobhan.mcgarrigle@southampton.gov.uk


The Wreck of the Titanic - composed by the late David Bedford
Thursday 22 March at 7pm-8.30pm
Southampton Central Hall, St. Mary Street, Southampton, Hampshire SO14 1NF
Contact: Linda Higson 01202 644707 or e-mail: lhigson@bsorchestra.co.uk
Pupils from various Southampton schools will be performing including The Southampton Youth Concert Sinfonia, First Steps, Stick It Percussion Ensemble, Ready Steady Sing and Southampton Young Singers. A version of this concert will also be played in the Cherbourg Theatre on 14th April 2012.

A Titanic Day for all the Family
Monday 2 April at 11am and 3pm
Southampton City Art Gallery, Civic Centre Southampton SO14 7LP
Free drop in session. An exciting array of activities will be on offer for all the family to commemorate the Titanic Centenary. Activities include rhymes, songs & shanties with storyteller Fiona Moore; green screen acting & filming opportunities with filmmakers from ‘Butterfly FX’; launch of the “Favourite Book to Share” competition for Under 5s in partnership with Southampton libraries; Titanic 2012 creative writing competition station; art and craft activities with artists Holly Deacon, and even have your own maritime-inspired face painted!

Ancestors Lost at Sea! Presented by The Family History Club with Dr Simon Wills
Wednesday 4 April at 7pm -9pm
Southampton Central Library, Civic Centre Southampton SO14 7LP
Contact:The event is Free but a ticket must be collected from the Local Studies Library from 1st February
The Titanic was just one of hundreds of thousands of British merchant ships that have been lost in peace and war. Was your ancestor on board one? A crew member, a passenger, maybe even the captain? Have you been trying to trace a ship that disappeared? Come and join in this event to help you find out more using websites, Southampton Library’s collection, and the resources of the National Archives. Bring along details of any ancestors or ships you’re trying to find. Dr Simon Wills is a maritime genealogist who has been researching and writing about maritime ancestors for over twenty years. He has a special interest in the merchant navy 1750 to 1950. He lives in Southampton and has just completed his book ‘Tracing Your Merchant Navy Ancestors.

Titanic Grave Walks
Friday 6, Saturday 7, Monday 9, Thursday 12, Friday 13, and Saturday 14 April at 11am and 2pm
The Old Cemetery, Southampton Common (off Hill Lane), Southampton, SO15 7NN
Free but places are limited and must be booked in advance.
Contact: 023 8034 9414 or e-mail fosoc1846@googlemail.com
Southampton Old Cemetery opened in 1846 and was one of the first Municipal owned Cemetery's in England. It covers 27 acres and holds over 1,680 burials. The Cemetery holds 45 Memorials for Titanic victims. The Friends of Southampton Old Cemetery are a group of volunteers who are interested in the history and maintenance of the Grade II listed Cemetery. The volunteers will lead walks around these memorials and relate the hardship the families suffered through the disaster. Walks last approximately 1.5 hours. On all walks there will be Titanic memorabilia and books for sale and refreshments will be available.

Titanic Trail Walks
Saturday 7, Monday 9, Wednesday 11, Friday 13 and Saturday 14 April
April at 1.30pm and 2.30pm
Walk begins at Holy Rood Church, High Street, Southampton
Free but places are limited and must be booked in advance
Contact: 023 8057 1858 (office hours only) or e-mail Drob007@aol.com
Southampton Tourist Guides Association is the only official tour guiding organisation in Southampton. As a consortium of fully qualified tourist guides we be dedicated to serving residents and visitors to the city and its surrounds in their quest to finding out what there is to know about this part of England's origins, history and culture.

Oxford Street Remembers
Saturday 7 April
Step back in time to 1912 as the Oxford Street remembers Titanic. Visit the street to enjoy: Special menus, a Titanic Trail, meet costumed characters and browse a special maritime themed market of local artists and creatives.

Titanic - From Prow to Stern
Tuesday 10 April - Sunday 15 April
Andrews( East Park) Adjoining Guildhall Square
Presented by The Nuffield Theatre and Southampton City Council
Titanic – From Prow to Stern is a full-scale outline of the Titanic including the exact length and beam, together with an indication of the positions of the main features, lifeboats and funnels. You will be able to grasp the scale and indeed walk its entire length. The installation will also include voice recordings from the archive of the City’s Oral History Unit, and the names of all those from Southampton who perished, with simple commemorative flowers. During the night of the centenary there will be a spoken timeline of events and Distress Flares launched. The intention is not to dramatise the incident, only to provide an accurate and evocative space for reflection and remembering.

City of Southampton Orchestra Concert
Tuesday 10 April at 7.30pm
Queen Elizabeth Terminal, Southampton Docks
Tickets:Tickets (unreserved) are available direct from the orchestra and are priced £14 (full), £12 (over-60s), £10 (students & unemployed) and £7 (under-16s).
Contact: Please visit the orchestra website at the bottom of the page for tickets and further information or email publicity@csorchestra.org or telephone 023 8077 9340.
The City of Southampton Orchestra is presenting a joint event with ABP and Brazier Interiors. A special concert from the Queen Elizabeth Terminal, overlooking the berth from which the Titanic set sail. The orchestra will be joined in Vaughan Williams’ magnificent ‘Sea Symphony’, by soloists Jane Streeton (soprano) and Mark Oldfield (baritone) as well as a specially formed ‘Titanic Chorus’ made up of members of the Southampton Philharmonic Society, Taunton’s Community Choir, Romsey Choral Society and Basingstoke Philharmonic. The symphony uses texts about the sea by Walt Whitman and will be a fitting tribute to the Titanic and the spirit of adventure of those sailing on her.
The evening will commence with an ‘embarkation experience’ exhibition with drinks reception and palm court music from the White Star song book. The orchestra will be working with Greyladyes Arts Foundation in presenting an exhibition reflecting the dockside experience of 1912 and members of the Sarah Siddons Theatre Group, which specialises in reconstructing Southampton history, will be enacting characters of the time.

Sarah Siddons Fan Club presents Titanic, the Southampton Story
Wednesday 11 April 2pm & 7pm, Saturday 14 April 2pm and Sunday 15 April 2pm
Meet at Holyrood Church
Tickets: Available from 1st February and can be purchased from the Southampton Visitor Information Centre, Lower Ground Floor, Central Library, SO14 7LW. Adults £7 Under 16’s £5
The Titanic story has particular resonance for street theatre company The Sarah Siddons Fan Club as two members have relatives who were crew on the ship. In researching for their latest production Titanic, the Southampton Story they were able to call on first hand accounts from family members as well as witness accounts from the enquiries and the records of the Titanic Fund. The theatre company specialise in site specific productions about real historical incidents and Titanic, the Southampton Story is no exception, using real buildings from the period as backdrops the performance will focus on the experiences of the crew and their families from the excitement of the maiden voyage through to the aftermath of the tragedy.
Starting at Holy Rood, onto the houses in College Street, over to Oxford Street and then performing scenes outside Seaman’s Mission, The Grapes, SW House, over to Queens Park and finishing in St Joseph's Church.

Look Out! Southampton’s Titanic Story In Song
Wednesday 11 April at 8pm
Turner Sims Concert Hall, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ
Box Office: 023 8059 5151
Look Out! is performed by White Star Line-Up – a group of primarily Southampton-based singers and musicians formed specifically to tell this story. Featuring song, music and spoken word, it relates the events leading up to the tragedy, and the aftermath, from the viewpoint of the town and its Southampton crew.

Tiddler the Story Telling Fish: family workshop (5 +)
Wednesday 11 April - Two sessions 10am–12noon and 1.30pm –3.30pm
Sea City Museum, Havelock Road Southampton
Admission: FREE Activity but must be pre-booked through SCC Arts & Heritage. 15 spaces per session; £5 refundable deposit required.
Contact: Please call 023 8083 4536 to book
Hear the story of Tiddler by Julia Donaldson and then create your own colourful fishy sculpture with artist Debra Marsh. In Partnership with Southampton City Libraries to celebrate this year’s ‘Book to Share Award’. Activities are funded by Southampton Wider Family Learning are limited to two children per adult. All children must be accompanied by an adult.

An evening with authors Christopher Ward & Gill Paul
Wednesday 11 April at 7pm - 9pm
Southampton Solent University Conference Centre, Sir James Matthews Building, 157-187 Above Bar St, SO14 7NN
Tickets: Will be £3 and available from 1st February and can be purchased from the Southampton Visitor Information Centre, Lower Ground Floor, Central Library Tel; 023 8083 3333
In partnership with Solent University and Waterstones. Christopher Ward is the grandson of Jock Hume, at 21 the youngest member of the Titanic's orchestra.
Gill Paul is the author of more than 30 books, including biographies and novels. Waterstones will be selling copies of the books on the evening.

Porthole Pictures: Family workshop (5 +)
Thursday 12 April - Two sessions: 10am–12noon & 1.30pm –3.30pm
Sea City Museum, Havelock Road, Southampton
Admission: FREE but must be pre-booked through SCC Arts & Heritage. 15 spaces per session, £5 refundable deposit required.
Contact: Please call 023 8083 4536 to book.
Get your imagination flowing with a maritime story and then work with artist Holly Deacon to create amazing pictures of what you might sea through a porthole if you were sailing in the ocean. In partnership with Southampton Libraries to celebrate this year’s ‘Book to Share Award’. Activities are funded by Southampton Wider Family Learning are limited to two children per adult. All children must be accompanied by an adult.

‘Discover Southampton’s Titanic Story’ presented by Southampton City Libraries Local History Forum
Thursday 12 April at 7pm - 9pm
Sea City Museum, Havelock Road, Southampton
Admission: £5 and will include an exclusive tour of the Titanic Exhibition
Contact: Tickets will be available from 1st February and can be purchased from the Southampton Visitor Information Centre, Lower Ground Floor, Central Library, SO14 7LW.
Come along for an exclusive tour of the ‘Titanic’ Gallery followed by short presentations and a question and answers sessions with our specialist panel -
Maria Newbery, Curator of Maritime & Local Collections / Vicky Green, Crew Specialist and Jo Smith Archivist will be on hand to tell you more about some of the rich resources held within the city’s museums, libraries and archives.

A Night To Remember
Thursday 12 April
Harbour Lights Picture House, Ocean Village, Southampton SO14 3TL
Contact: 0871 902 5733
A Night To Remember is a 1958 docudrama film adaptation of Walter Lord's book of the same name, recounting the final night of the RMS Titanic.

Red Hot Press Exhibition
Thursday 12 April Preview evening at 5-7pm
Contact: For more information about Red Hot Press or this project contact Sarah 07790 870558 or Katherine 07814 016563 or email inforhp@redhotpress.org.uk
Southampton Solent University During April you will be able to visit an exciting new exhibition by members of Red Hot Press print workshop. To commemorate the Titanic's centenary workshop members have produced a boxed set of 17 original prints on the theme of the Titanic. A limited edition of 9 box sets of prints will be for sale and the complete set will be exhibited in the Concourse Gallery of Southampton Solent University throughout April 2012.

Titanic Family Discovery Day
Friday 14 April, Saturday 14 April at 11am and 3pm
Sea City Museum, Havelock Road, Southampton
FREE drop in sessions
Come and celebrate Sea City’s opening weekend with all the family! Enjoy these FREE exciting array of activities to celebrate Southampton’s rich maritime history. Be arty, talk to costume interpreters, try your hand at a Victorian game and enjoy all that Sea City Museum has to offer. Entrance charges apply.

SCO-CoMA Titanic Commemoration Concert
Saturday 14 April at 7.30pm
Southampton Guildhall, West Marlands Road Southampton SO14 7LP
Tickets: Tbc
On the exact anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, the Southampton Concert Orchestra and Contemporary Music for All are collaborating to perform a concert of classical and contemporary music honouring the tragic event one hundred years ago to the day.
Highlights of the concert will be Dvorak's New World Symphony, representing the hopes and aspirations of many of those passengers who set off for a better life the new world, and a newly arranged version of Gavin Bryars' mood piece Titanic which re-creates the sounds and spirits of the last moments of the ill-fated voyage.

British Titanic Society Annual Convention
Saturday 14 April at 9am – 4pm
De Vere Grand Harbour Hotel, West Quay Rd, SO15 1AG
Admission: Entrance fee £3 / Concessions £2
The British Titanic Society will be holding its annual convention at the De Vere Grand Harbour hotel, Southampton, from Thursday 12th to Sunday 15th April 2012. April 2012 marks the centenary of the loss of Titanic and the 25th anniversary of the founding of the society. This is a unique event in the Titanic calendar and the convention, which spans four days, is themed “A Time To Remember.” Saturday 14th April will be our Public Open Day. You do not have to be a delegate or even a member of the society to take part, so why not come along? It promises to be a superb day out for all the family, with Titanic lectures, a sales fair of Titanic and other maritime items, and a fabulous exhibition

Wreath laying on the grave of Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron
Sunday 15 April at 11.15am
The Old Burial Ground, Corner of High Street & West End Road (behind the War Memorial), West End
This event is being hosted by West End Local History Society. The service will be addressed by Revd. Brian Pickett, Vicar of St. James’ Church, WEST END officiating. Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron, was captain of the rescue ship RMS Carpathia that rescued 705 survivors of the Titanic disaster. All welcome to attend

100th Anniversary Commemorative Service
Sunday 15 April at 2pm
St Mary's Church, St Mary Street Southampton SO14 1NX
This annual commemorative service will be lead by Reverend Dr Julian Davies. The service will include readings, music from the Salvation Army Band and the City of Southampton Orchestra and singing by local choirs. The Mayor of Southampton Councillor Terry Matthews will be in attendance.

Titanic Cultural Day
Saturday 21 April
Avenue Campus Building 65, University of Southampton Avenue Campus Southampton SO17 1BF
To register your interest please send an email to humanitieslearn@southampton.ac.uk
Charges: £25, £20 concessions Includes lunch and refreshments
Coinciding with the centenary of the departure of the Titanic on her fateful voyage from Southampton and her sinking on 15 April 1912, this cultural day will explore the rich cultural history of the retelling of the ship’s story in literary and cinematic form, and across many different cultural contexts. Filmic representations range from a silent German movie made only weeks after the disaster to James Cameron’s epic from 1997, with a number of British, American, and European productions in between. The Cultural day will also explore a number of wider issues relating to the connections between maritime history and the cinema.
Places are limited, so book your place early to avoid disappointment.

Sea City …coming soon
April 2012
Work has started on transforming the Grade II Old Magistrates’ Court building into the Sea City visitor attraction, which is due to open in April 2012 in time to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the disaster. The first temporary exhibition for 2012 will be ‘Titanic – the Legend’ and will focus on the international fascination with the story of the Titanic.

‘Titanic 3D’ Featurette: James Cameron Pitches His 3D Vision

James Cameron talks about why’Titanic’ is a worthy 3D movie experience, and a look at some polished footage from the film suggests that the acclaimed director may be right.

james cameron titanic 3d clip

It was a year ago that we first learned that Titanic was being converted into 3D, and since then, reaction has been joyous nostalgia juxtaposed to continued disdain for a filmmaking format that some just refuse to embrace.

Well, anti-3D people, James Cameron feels your pain and he wants to explain to you (and anybody else who may be wondering) just why Titanic 3D is going to be worth your while. Better yet: he’s not going to just tell you, he’s going to (sort of) show you why Titanic is worth a 3D conversion.

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