Titanic News

Current news and events about the RMS Titanic, including exhibitions, artefacts, films and documentaries and historical information about the Titanic

Latest Titanic News July 2012

Titanic Exhibit In San Diego(21 Jul 2012, OCRegister)

Museums around the world are marking the anniversary of the April 15, 1912, incident, made even more famous by the 1997 movie "Titanic." A major local commemoration is the virtual voyage at San Diego Natural History Museum. When you buy a $27 ticket aboard the Titanic, you are assigned the name of an actual 1912 passenger and walk through exhibit galleries that explain how Titanic came to be, some of the personalities aboard the vessel's celebrated maiden voyage, how she met her demise and how artifacts being salvaged from the ocean floor are keeping Titanic's legacy alive. You view some 200 artifacts, including passengers' personal belongings, raised from the deep. The exhibit runs through Sept. 9.

Clive Palmer reveals detailed plans for Titanic II(17 Jul 2012, Herald Sun)

The outspoken businessman said a casino would most probably be restricted to first class passengers only to ensure those who could not afford to lose money didn't. "There'll be some sort of screening (process)," Mr Palmer said. We'll be in international waters so we'll probably be able to stop pensioners coming without breaching any legislation." He said the replica of the ill-fated Titanic would feature a number of key differences including the addition of a "safety deck" with "proper lifeboats".

As Titanic's Discoverer Does Research At Sea, Armchair Explorers Can Watch Online(16 Jul 2012, Washington Post)

Bob Ballard, who discovered the Titanic in 1985, is a shipwreck-finding machine. Now you can watch his crew search for ancient wrecks through the eyes of the machines that do the real work. This summer, as Ballard and his exploration ship Nautilus sail the Black and Mediterranean seas, armchair explorers can watch online atwww.nautiluslive.org. As a rotating crew of 100 scientists and educators search for Byzantine-era ships and sample ocean life, live video from two remotely operated vehicles — the classically named Hercules and Argus — will take viewers to the seafloor in real time. Outfitted with a high-speed data link, the Nautilus is the only exploration ship in the world bringing the public along for the ride.

Get Titanic Books & Movies In Our Titanic Store!

Halifax Served As Final Port For Many Titanic Victims(15 Jul 2012, Nashua Telegraph)

We stood in a light misty rain at the bottom of a gentle rise at the upper end of the Fairview Cemetery in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Ahead of us, four rows of mostly identical gray granite markers curved inward to come to a point at the top of the rise. Our tour guide, a gentlemanly, kilt-wearing Scotsman named Doug, said the curve was deliberate, to indicate the prow of a ship. Each marker bears the date April 15, 1912, the date these 121 people died on the steamship Titanic. Each marker has a name, if known, and many aren’t, and a number that indicates the order in which the body was found. Since some bodies were so badly damaged that they were buried at sea and some were removed by family members, the numbers exceed the 149 buried in Halifax. Perhaps being there in the rain was appropriate: It’s a sad place, but a well-kept, revered spot.

Unsinkable Molly Brown's 145Th Birthday Shared With Community, Family(15 Jul 2o12, Denver Post)

It wasn't the woman in the white Victorian gown and satin gloves who drew the most looks at Molly Brown's 145th-birthday celebration Sunday but the woman in a red shirt and jeans — Brown's great-granddaughter. Helen Benziger, 61, joined the crowd celebrating her great-grandmother's birthday at the Molly Brown House Museum in Denver. "This is the most amazing thing that she could have dreamed of," Benziger said. "She would love it if she knew that this many people, a hundred years later, still came here and held her in such great esteem." The event included children's activities, tours of the home — saved from demolition in 1970 — historic presentations and cake.

Shop Amazon - Back to School

Premier Exhibitions 1Q Profit Up, Attendance Rises(12 Jul 2012, Businessweek)

Premier Exhibitions, known for its 'Bodies' shows and Titanic exhibit, posted a 9 percent jump in first-quarter net income as it held more events and operated on more days during the period. The Atlanta company earned $1.2 million, or 2 cents per share, for the three months ended May 31. That compares with $1.1 million, or 2 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue rose 19 percent to $11.5 million from $9.7 million.

Washington Post Receives 'Adorable' Letter From Fifth Graders Correcting Mistake In Titanic Story(11 Jul 2012, Huffington Post)

After publishing an April roundup post of Titanic books, Washington Post contributing editor Dennis Drabelle received the most adorable correction ever from an unlikely source -- a fifth grade class from Burning Tree Elementary School in Bethesda, Md., Poynter reports. Drabelle had initially written that Titanic collided with the iceberg on April 15 -- something the youngsters refuted with an adorable correction written on a large letter. “Based on our research,” wrote Mrs. Reed’s fifth-grade class, “the Titanic hit the iceberg shortly before midnight on April 14, 1912.” Whoops!

Rare Titanic Rescuers' Medal Up For Auction(10 Jul 2012, This is Bath)

The medal is believed to be the rarest of its kind – only a few were made and the one being sold by auctioneers Aldridge & Sons in Wiltshire later this month is the most senior to be sold. It was given to the Carpathia’s second officer, James Bisset and is a gold medal of thanks – it’s only the second gold medal to be offered for sale anywhere in the world in the past 25 years. “It’s thought to be the most senior officer’s medal ever to go under the hammer,” said Andrew Aldridge, from the Devizes firm.

Titanic in Photographs (Titanic Collection)

Ready For A Titanic Feast?(9 Jul 2012, The Sunshine Coast Daily)

Food and wine lovers with a sense of history will be in their element from Monday July 30 to Sunday 5 August when the 'Titanic Culinary Journey' sets sail at Palmer Coolum Resort. The lavish menus from the world's most famous ship, the RMS Titanic, will be lovingly recreated by Palmer Coolum Resort's skilled chefs during a romantic culinary celebration that will encapsulate breakfast, lunch and dinner at the resort's sumptuous restaurants. While guests indulge their tastebuds from the delectable menus, imagery and entertainment will complete the experience by showcasing the extravagance that was so prevalent in maritime travel during early 1900s.

Memorial Plaque For Titanic Workers(7 Jul 2012, Belfast Telegraph)

A memorial plaque in tribute to eight shipyard workers who lost their lives during the construction of the Titanic has been unveiled. First Minister Peter Robinson unveiled the memorial erected outside the club rooms of Harland and Wolff Welders’ Football and Social Club in east Belfast.

New Exhibit Gives Residents Up Close Look At Titanic(7 Jul 2012, WACH)

The South Carolina State Museum has a new Titanic exhibit; which has been a popular one so far this summer. The exhibit includes over 100 artifacts found from the actual ship wreck; from dishes to clothing to purses; even beds. There is also a movie showcasing how it was built until it sank. Another unique feature is a fake iceberg for people to touch. It shows just how cold the water was that froze most of the passengers to death.

Titanic Discoverer Locates Turkish Pilots Shot Down By Syria(4 Jul 2012, Telegraph.co.uk)

The discovery of the two corpses on the seabed could help to settle an argument over whether the plane was shot down in international airspace or over Syrian territorial waters. Turkey recruited the services of Robert Ballard, a renowned oceanographer who discovered the wreckage of the Titanic in 1985, to locate the remains of the F-4 Phantom and its two missing crew members. The bodies of Gokhan Ertan and Hasan Huseyin Aksov were located by the MV Nautilus, an American deep-sea exploration vessel led by Mr Ballard. The boat is now attempting to retrieve the remains of the two men. The wreckage of the plane itself has yet to be found. Turkey will hope that its retrieval will boost its case that Syria shot the aircraft down deliberately and without warning in international airspace -- although it has acknowledged that the plane probably drifted into Syrian waters when it crashed.

Titanic Souvenirs And More At Old Museo Maritimo(3 Jul 2012, ABS CBN News)

Video of Titanic artifacts and related items at Old Museo Maritimo in Pasay City, Phillippines.

Human remains possibly found in Titanic shipwreck

The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

AP

The remains of a coat and boots, articulated in the mud on the sea bed near Titanic's stern, are suggestive evidence of where a victim of the disaster came to rest.

Human remains may be embedded in the mud of the North Atlantic where the New York-bound Titanic came to rest when it sank 100 years ago, a federal official said Saturday.

A 2004 photograph, released to the public for the first time this week in an uncropped version to coincide with the disaster’s centenary, shows a coat and boots in the mud at the legendary shipwreck site.

“These are not shoes that fell out neatly from somebody’s bag right next to each other,” James Delgado, the director of maritime heritage at the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration, told The Associated Press in a phone interview.

PHOTOS: LOOKING BACK 100 YEARS LATER: THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC

The way they are “laid out” makes a “compelling case” that it is where “someone has come to rest,” he said.

The image, along with two others showing pairs of boots resting next to each other, were taken during an expedition led by NOAA and famed Titanic finder Robert Ballard in 2004. They were published in Ballard’s book on the expedition. Delgado said the one showing a coat and boots was cropped to show only a boot.

REMAINS16N_2_WEB

AP

Filmmaker James Cameron, who has visited the wreck 33 times, has said he has seen “zero human remains” during his extensive explorations of the Titanic.

The New York Times first reported about the photographs in Saturday editions.

Filmmaker James Cameron, who has visited the wreck 33 times, told the newspaper that he had seen “zero human remains” during his extensive explorations of the Titanic. “We’ve seen shoes. We’ve seen pairs of shoes, which would strongly suggest there was a body there at one point. But we’ve never seen any human remains.”

For Delgado, who was the chief scientist on an expedition in 2010 that mapped the entire site, the difference in opinion is “one of semantics.”


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/human-remains-possibly-found-titanic-shipwreck-article-1.1061974#ixzz1sAX7cuMI

Titanic wreck to gain UNESCO protection

Titanic wreck to gain UNESCO protection

Updated April 06, 2012 12:01:16

The wreck of the Titanic will this month come under UNESCO protection, as it has now been lying at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean for 100 years.

The British liner sank in international waters and so comes under no state's protection but, after a century, wrecks fall under the jurisdiction of a 2009 UN Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage.

"From now on, state parties to the convention can outlaw the destruction, pillage, sale and dispersal of objects found at the site," UNESCO said, in a statement from its Paris headquarters.

"They can take all possible measures within their power to protect the wreck and ensure that the human remains there are treated with dignity."

The passenger liner hit an iceberg on its maiden voyage across the Atlantic, sinking to almost 4,000 metres in waters off Newfoundland on the night of April 14, 1912, with the loss of 1,514 people on board.

It was and remains one of the worst peacetime shipping disasters in history, and this year's anniversary is being marked by several cultural and historical events in Britain and the United States, its intended destination.

The wreck was rediscovered in 1985 thanks to advances in submarine technology, and historic artefacts have since been recovered.

"The sinking of the Titanic is anchored in the memory of humanity and I am pleased that this site can now be protected by the UNESCO Convention," UNESCO director general Irina Bokova said.

click here for complete article

 

"Titanic" director makes first solo dive to Earth's deepest point

At 5:52 p.m. ET Sunday (7:52 a.m. Monday, local time), James Cameron arrived at the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep, members of the National Geographic expedition have confirmed.

His depth on arrival: 35,756 feet (10,898 meters)—a figure unattainable anywhere else in the ocean.

Reaching bottom after a 2-hour-and-36-minute descent, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker typed out welcome words for the cheering support crew waiting at the surface: "All systems OK."

Folded into a sub cockpit as cramped as any Apollo capsule, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker is now investigating a seascape more alien to humans than the moon. Cameron is only the third person to reach this Pacific Ocean valley southwest of Guam (map)—and the only one to do so solo.

Hovering in what he's called a vertical torpedo, Cameron is likely collecting data, specimens, and imagery unthinkable in 1960, when the only other explorers to reach Challenger Deep returned after seeing little more than the silt stirred up by their bathyscaphe.

After as long as six hours in the trench, Cameron—best known for creating fictional worlds on film (Avatar, Titanic, The Abyss)—is to jettison steel weights attached to the sub and shoot back to the surface. (See pictures of Cameron's sub.)

Meanwhile, the expedition's scientific support team awaits his return aboard the research ships Mermaid Sapphire and Barakuda, 7 miles (11 kilometers) up. (Video: how sound revealed that Challenger Deep is the deepest spot in the ocean.)

"We're now a band of brothers and sisters that have been through this for a while," marine biologist Doug Bartlett told National Geographic News from the ship before the dive.

Click here for the complete story

Titanic: What really happened

National GeographicTHE sinking of the Titanic was one of the 20th century's great dramas, a mystery that has confounded scientists and historians for decades.

 New photos of the ship that sank 100 years ago on April 15, on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York, will be published in the April edition of National Geographic Magazine for the first time giving a sense of what the wreck looks like today.

The photographs, shot by independent research group Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, provide a greater understanding of what happened on that fateful day.

The photos are the by-product of a multi-million dollar, two-month expedition that used a number of different approaches to get never-before-seen views of the wrecked ship.

For much of August and September 2010, explorers used robotic vehicles to sweep the 5km-by-8km site, scanning images that were later combined to produce the first shot below.

Side-scan and multibeam sonar was used to store the minute details of the ship and to evaluate what has changed since previous exploratory expeditions.

During these sweeps, the robots stored "ribbons" of data, with the products of the repeated attempts then collected together and observed as a whole unit.

Click here for entire article

Full Titanic wreck site is mapped for 1st time

This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the stern of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)

(AP) SOUTH PORTLAND, Maine - Researchers have pieced together what's believed to be the first comprehensive map of the entire 3-by-5-mile Titanic debris field and hope it will provide new clues about what exactly happened the night 100 years ago when the superliner hit an iceberg, plunged to the bottom of the North Atlantic and became a legend.

Marks on the muddy ocean bottom suggest, for instance, that the stern rotated like a helicopter blade as the ship sank, rather than plunging straight down, researchers told The Associated Press this week.

An expedition team used sonar imaging and more than 100,000 photos taken from underwater robots to create the map, which shows where hundreds of objects and pieces of the presumed-unsinkable vessel landed after striking an iceberg, killing more than 1,500 people.

Explorers of the Titanic — which sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York City — have known for more than 25 years where the bow and stern landed after the vessel struck an iceberg. But previous maps of the floor around the wreckage were incomplete, said Parks Stephenson, a Titanic historian who consulted on the 2010 expedition. Studying the site with old maps was like trying to navigate a dark room with a weak flashlight.

"With the sonar map, it's like suddenly the entire room lit up and you can go from room to room with a magnifying glass and document it," he said. "Nothing like this has ever been done for the Titanic site."

The mapping took place in the summer of 2010 during an expedition to the Titanic led by RMS Titanic Inc., the legal custodian of the wreck, along with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Falmouth, Mass., and the Waitt Institute of La Jolla, Calif.

James Cameron to dive to ocean's deepest point

They were joined by other groups, as well as the cable History channel. Details on the new findings at the bottom of the ocean are not being revealed yet, but the network will air them in a two-hour documentary on April 15, exactly 100 years after the Titanic sank.

Click here for entire article