Titanic News

Current news and events about the RMS Titanic, including exhibitions, artefacts, films and documentaries and historical information about the Titanic

Latest Titanic News July 2012

Titanic Exhibit In San Diego(21 Jul 2012, OCRegister)

Museums around the world are marking the anniversary of the April 15, 1912, incident, made even more famous by the 1997 movie "Titanic." A major local commemoration is the virtual voyage at San Diego Natural History Museum. When you buy a $27 ticket aboard the Titanic, you are assigned the name of an actual 1912 passenger and walk through exhibit galleries that explain how Titanic came to be, some of the personalities aboard the vessel's celebrated maiden voyage, how she met her demise and how artifacts being salvaged from the ocean floor are keeping Titanic's legacy alive. You view some 200 artifacts, including passengers' personal belongings, raised from the deep. The exhibit runs through Sept. 9.

Clive Palmer reveals detailed plans for Titanic II(17 Jul 2012, Herald Sun)

The outspoken businessman said a casino would most probably be restricted to first class passengers only to ensure those who could not afford to lose money didn't. "There'll be some sort of screening (process)," Mr Palmer said. We'll be in international waters so we'll probably be able to stop pensioners coming without breaching any legislation." He said the replica of the ill-fated Titanic would feature a number of key differences including the addition of a "safety deck" with "proper lifeboats".

As Titanic's Discoverer Does Research At Sea, Armchair Explorers Can Watch Online(16 Jul 2012, Washington Post)

Bob Ballard, who discovered the Titanic in 1985, is a shipwreck-finding machine. Now you can watch his crew search for ancient wrecks through the eyes of the machines that do the real work. This summer, as Ballard and his exploration ship Nautilus sail the Black and Mediterranean seas, armchair explorers can watch online atwww.nautiluslive.org. As a rotating crew of 100 scientists and educators search for Byzantine-era ships and sample ocean life, live video from two remotely operated vehicles — the classically named Hercules and Argus — will take viewers to the seafloor in real time. Outfitted with a high-speed data link, the Nautilus is the only exploration ship in the world bringing the public along for the ride.

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Halifax Served As Final Port For Many Titanic Victims(15 Jul 2012, Nashua Telegraph)

We stood in a light misty rain at the bottom of a gentle rise at the upper end of the Fairview Cemetery in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Ahead of us, four rows of mostly identical gray granite markers curved inward to come to a point at the top of the rise. Our tour guide, a gentlemanly, kilt-wearing Scotsman named Doug, said the curve was deliberate, to indicate the prow of a ship. Each marker bears the date April 15, 1912, the date these 121 people died on the steamship Titanic. Each marker has a name, if known, and many aren’t, and a number that indicates the order in which the body was found. Since some bodies were so badly damaged that they were buried at sea and some were removed by family members, the numbers exceed the 149 buried in Halifax. Perhaps being there in the rain was appropriate: It’s a sad place, but a well-kept, revered spot.

Unsinkable Molly Brown's 145Th Birthday Shared With Community, Family(15 Jul 2o12, Denver Post)

It wasn't the woman in the white Victorian gown and satin gloves who drew the most looks at Molly Brown's 145th-birthday celebration Sunday but the woman in a red shirt and jeans — Brown's great-granddaughter. Helen Benziger, 61, joined the crowd celebrating her great-grandmother's birthday at the Molly Brown House Museum in Denver. "This is the most amazing thing that she could have dreamed of," Benziger said. "She would love it if she knew that this many people, a hundred years later, still came here and held her in such great esteem." The event included children's activities, tours of the home — saved from demolition in 1970 — historic presentations and cake.

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Premier Exhibitions 1Q Profit Up, Attendance Rises(12 Jul 2012, Businessweek)

Premier Exhibitions, known for its 'Bodies' shows and Titanic exhibit, posted a 9 percent jump in first-quarter net income as it held more events and operated on more days during the period. The Atlanta company earned $1.2 million, or 2 cents per share, for the three months ended May 31. That compares with $1.1 million, or 2 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue rose 19 percent to $11.5 million from $9.7 million.

Washington Post Receives 'Adorable' Letter From Fifth Graders Correcting Mistake In Titanic Story(11 Jul 2012, Huffington Post)

After publishing an April roundup post of Titanic books, Washington Post contributing editor Dennis Drabelle received the most adorable correction ever from an unlikely source -- a fifth grade class from Burning Tree Elementary School in Bethesda, Md., Poynter reports. Drabelle had initially written that Titanic collided with the iceberg on April 15 -- something the youngsters refuted with an adorable correction written on a large letter. “Based on our research,” wrote Mrs. Reed’s fifth-grade class, “the Titanic hit the iceberg shortly before midnight on April 14, 1912.” Whoops!

Rare Titanic Rescuers' Medal Up For Auction(10 Jul 2012, This is Bath)

The medal is believed to be the rarest of its kind – only a few were made and the one being sold by auctioneers Aldridge & Sons in Wiltshire later this month is the most senior to be sold. It was given to the Carpathia’s second officer, James Bisset and is a gold medal of thanks – it’s only the second gold medal to be offered for sale anywhere in the world in the past 25 years. “It’s thought to be the most senior officer’s medal ever to go under the hammer,” said Andrew Aldridge, from the Devizes firm.

Titanic in Photographs (Titanic Collection)

Ready For A Titanic Feast?(9 Jul 2012, The Sunshine Coast Daily)

Food and wine lovers with a sense of history will be in their element from Monday July 30 to Sunday 5 August when the 'Titanic Culinary Journey' sets sail at Palmer Coolum Resort. The lavish menus from the world's most famous ship, the RMS Titanic, will be lovingly recreated by Palmer Coolum Resort's skilled chefs during a romantic culinary celebration that will encapsulate breakfast, lunch and dinner at the resort's sumptuous restaurants. While guests indulge their tastebuds from the delectable menus, imagery and entertainment will complete the experience by showcasing the extravagance that was so prevalent in maritime travel during early 1900s.

Memorial Plaque For Titanic Workers(7 Jul 2012, Belfast Telegraph)

A memorial plaque in tribute to eight shipyard workers who lost their lives during the construction of the Titanic has been unveiled. First Minister Peter Robinson unveiled the memorial erected outside the club rooms of Harland and Wolff Welders’ Football and Social Club in east Belfast.

New Exhibit Gives Residents Up Close Look At Titanic(7 Jul 2012, WACH)

The South Carolina State Museum has a new Titanic exhibit; which has been a popular one so far this summer. The exhibit includes over 100 artifacts found from the actual ship wreck; from dishes to clothing to purses; even beds. There is also a movie showcasing how it was built until it sank. Another unique feature is a fake iceberg for people to touch. It shows just how cold the water was that froze most of the passengers to death.

Titanic Discoverer Locates Turkish Pilots Shot Down By Syria(4 Jul 2012, Telegraph.co.uk)

The discovery of the two corpses on the seabed could help to settle an argument over whether the plane was shot down in international airspace or over Syrian territorial waters. Turkey recruited the services of Robert Ballard, a renowned oceanographer who discovered the wreckage of the Titanic in 1985, to locate the remains of the F-4 Phantom and its two missing crew members. The bodies of Gokhan Ertan and Hasan Huseyin Aksov were located by the MV Nautilus, an American deep-sea exploration vessel led by Mr Ballard. The boat is now attempting to retrieve the remains of the two men. The wreckage of the plane itself has yet to be found. Turkey will hope that its retrieval will boost its case that Syria shot the aircraft down deliberately and without warning in international airspace -- although it has acknowledged that the plane probably drifted into Syrian waters when it crashed.

Titanic Souvenirs And More At Old Museo Maritimo(3 Jul 2012, ABS CBN News)

Video of Titanic artifacts and related items at Old Museo Maritimo in Pasay City, Phillippines.

It's full steam ahead for Titanic II

MINING tycoon Clive Palmer said today it was full steam ahead for his plan to build a 21st century version of the Titanic, with 20,000 people expressing interest in the maiden voyage.

There was scepticism when the self-made mining billionaire announced his ambitious plans in April to construct Titanic II with exactly the same dimensions as its ill-fated predecessor, which sank 100 years ago.

But Mr Palmer today said one of the world's leading ship design and marine engineering companies had now been commissioned to assist with the project.

Finnish-based Deltamarin, which has offices worldwide, will undertake a full review to ensure the vessel will be compliant with all current safety and construction regulations.

It will also ensure that the design criteria laid down by Blue Star Line, which Palmer established, are met.

The work carried out by Deltamarin will enable China's CSC Jinling Shipyard to begin construction of the passenger liner, which will be 270 metres long, 53 metres high and weigh 40,000 tonnes.

It will have 840 rooms and nine decks.

Mr Palmer said there had been keen international interest from passengers wanting to be on board the maiden commercial voyage scheduled for 2016 between England and North America.

"More than 20,000 people have registered on Blue Star Line's website expressing an interest in receiving regular updates from us or requesting information on how to secure bookings for Titanic II's maiden voyage," he said.

"Titanic II will be a regular feature on the transatlantic route between the UK and USA," Palmer added.

"This magnificent vessel is being constructed in memory of the heroic people who served on the first ship, as well as the passengers who sadly shared their fate."

Titanic sank on April 15, 1912 after striking an iceberg on its first voyage, from Southampton to New York, killing more than 1500 passengers and crew. The original liner was built in Belfast.

The ABC remembers Titanic 100 years on.

Australia's ABC has put together a great collection of Titanic resources to help commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of Titanic.  

There are numerous images, videos, articles and resources from 1912 and today.  I strongly recommend taking a look at this for a range of high quality Titanic content including the casualty lists of who went down with the Titanic? Examine 10 hastily typed fatality reports from the time.  Access it here.

Titanic: Underwhelming reviews for television drama

A scene from ITV1's Titanic The first outing of ITV1's Titanic beat the conclusion of period rival Upstairs Downstairs in the ratings

Related Stories

Julian Fellowes' Titanic drama has received largely lukewarm reviews from critics after Sunday's first episode aired on ITV1.

Writing in the Daily Telegraph, Sarah Crompton said: "There was both too much and too little to concentrate on, and no-one to care about.

"If I were forced to judge Titanic on this one episode alone, I'd call it a damp squib," she continued.

The four-part drama coincides with the centenary of the liner's sinking.

Ms Crompton added: "But having seen part two, I can assure you it gets better."

It stars Linus Roache, Celia Imrie, Geraldine Somerville, Toby Jones and the newly announced Doctor Who companion, Jenna-Louise Coleman.

'Over-hyped'

The mini-series has been generating huge interest following the success of Fellowes' Downton Abbey on both sides of the Atlantic.

And it attracted a strong audience, beating the final episode of 1930s drama Upstairs Downstairs on BBC One, which aired at the same time.

Upstairs Downstairs had an average audience of 4.4 million, while Titanic's average was 7.4 million, according to overnight figures.

Times critic Andrew Billen said that he struggled with the speed of the opening episode.

Click here for complete article.

"Titanic" director makes first solo dive to Earth's deepest point

At 5:52 p.m. ET Sunday (7:52 a.m. Monday, local time), James Cameron arrived at the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep, members of the National Geographic expedition have confirmed.

His depth on arrival: 35,756 feet (10,898 meters)—a figure unattainable anywhere else in the ocean.

Reaching bottom after a 2-hour-and-36-minute descent, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker typed out welcome words for the cheering support crew waiting at the surface: "All systems OK."

Folded into a sub cockpit as cramped as any Apollo capsule, the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker is now investigating a seascape more alien to humans than the moon. Cameron is only the third person to reach this Pacific Ocean valley southwest of Guam (map)—and the only one to do so solo.

Hovering in what he's called a vertical torpedo, Cameron is likely collecting data, specimens, and imagery unthinkable in 1960, when the only other explorers to reach Challenger Deep returned after seeing little more than the silt stirred up by their bathyscaphe.

After as long as six hours in the trench, Cameron—best known for creating fictional worlds on film (Avatar, Titanic, The Abyss)—is to jettison steel weights attached to the sub and shoot back to the surface. (See pictures of Cameron's sub.)

Meanwhile, the expedition's scientific support team awaits his return aboard the research ships Mermaid Sapphire and Barakuda, 7 miles (11 kilometers) up. (Video: how sound revealed that Challenger Deep is the deepest spot in the ocean.)

"We're now a band of brothers and sisters that have been through this for a while," marine biologist Doug Bartlett told National Geographic News from the ship before the dive.

Click here for the complete story

New Titanic Mini-Series from Downton Abbey Creators

Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes has finished production on a four-part miniseries called Titanic, which will premiere on ABC this April.

Let heaven and angels sing Hallelujah.

Along with virtually every other thing that is happening in April, the series' debut is set to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic.

This review of the show in the Guardian comes as close to saying the program is straight up exactly like Downton Abbey as one can come without actually saying that. In other words: look for it to be alternately frustrating and amazing and expecting you to fawn all over it when it shows up to tea wearing ugly hammer pants.

Oh, there is one twist:

In an innovative, but not entirely successful move, viewers will watch the boat begin to sink at the end of each episode, as Fellowes retells the story from different characters' viewpoints. Who survives the tragedy, however, is not revealed until the final episode.

The Guardian review notes that this effect is "sometimes confusing," but that is definitely not going to stop everyone you know from watching.

What sank the Titanic? Scientists point to the moon

A hand out image released May 19, 2003 shows a photo of the Titanic. REUTERS/Christie's  NMB/JV

By Jim Forsyth

SAN ANTONIO | Tue Mar 6, 2012 3:30pm EST

(Reuters) - A century after the Titanic disaster, scientists have found an unexpected culprit for the sinking: the moon.

Anyone who knows history or has seen the blockbuster movies knows that the cause of the transatlantic liner's accident 100 years ago next month was that it hit an iceberg.

"But the lunar connection may explain how an unusually large number of icebergs got into the path of the Titanic," said Donald Olson, a Texas State University physicist whose team of forensic astronomers examined the moon's role.

Ever since the Titanic sank in the early hours of April 15, 1912, killing 1,517 people, researchers have puzzled over Captain Edward Smith's seeming disregard of warnings that icebergs were in the area where the ship was sailing.

Smith was the most experienced captain in the White Star Line and had sailed the North Atlantic sea lanes on numerous occasions. He had been assigned to the maiden voyage of the Titanic because he was a knowledgeable and careful seaman.

 

Click here to read complete article

 

‘Titanic 3D’ Featurette: James Cameron Pitches His 3D Vision

James Cameron talks about why’Titanic’ is a worthy 3D movie experience, and a look at some polished footage from the film suggests that the acclaimed director may be right.

james cameron titanic 3d clip

It was a year ago that we first learned that Titanic was being converted into 3D, and since then, reaction has been joyous nostalgia juxtaposed to continued disdain for a filmmaking format that some just refuse to embrace.

Well, anti-3D people, James Cameron feels your pain and he wants to explain to you (and anybody else who may be wondering) just why Titanic 3D is going to be worth your while. Better yet: he’s not going to just tell you, he’s going to (sort of) show you why Titanic is worth a 3D conversion.

Click here for full story

Titanic Exhibition Arrives at The O2

When Titanic set sail from Southampton on 10 April 1912, the ship was thought to be virtually unsinkable. But five days later, it collided with an iceberg and sank with the loss of 1,500 lives.

Now hundreds of original artefacts from Titanic are going on show at The O2 in London. I had a preview of the exhibition this morning.

On entering the gallery, the first thing you see is the bell from the ship’s crow’s nest, lit up in red and accompanied by evocative music and ringing sounds. Lookout Frederick Fleet rang the bell three times on the night of the collision, with the warning ”iceberg right ahead!”

In subsequent rooms, you learn about the design and construction of the Titanic, before seeing an array of passenger possessions, which are a poignant reminder of the lives lost. There are playing cards, a leather cigarette case, a toothpaste jar, and even a handkerchief that survived years under the ocean.

The exhibition gives a good feel of the ship’s interiors. There are reconstructions of first and third-class cabins and the dramatic engine room, as well as fascinating artefacts such as the bath plug from a first-class cabin, which was installed at the side of the bath so passengers didn’t have to reach into the dirty water. (The 700 third-class passengers had to share two bathtubs.)

Titanic was designed to carry cargo, hence the full title RMS (Royal Mail Ship) Titanic, and there’s a gallery displaying the remnants of some of this cargo. Although shipping goods on Titanic was relatively expensive, traders saved on insurance costs because the ship was considered to be so safe.

As you near the end of the exhibition, the galleries become noticeably colder and darker. There’s a frosty iceberg wall, where you can feel how cold the sea was on the night of the disaster. Many of the casualties died of hyperthermia rather than drowning.

At the exhibition’s entrance, everyone receives a boarding pass with the name and details of a real Titanic passenger. At the end you can check the “memorial wall” to find out whether the person named on your card survived. The exhibition is an educational and emotional journey, and well worth a visit when it opens to the public on Friday.

Titanic: The Artefact Exhibition is at The O2 from 5 November 2010 to 1 May 2011

Titanic launch 100th anniversary marked by Belfast flare

A single flare was fired above the city's docklands to signify the exact moment - 12.13pm - 100 years ago when the ill-fated liner rolled down the slipway and touched the water for the first time.

All boats in the area around the Harland and Wolff shipyards, where the pride of the White Star fleet was built, then sounded their horns.

In 1911, thousands of cheering well-wishers gathered at the same place to celebrate the historic moment.

A century on, the mood was again one of celebration at the event on the Queen's Island slipway which focused more on the ship's construction than its fate.

After the flare was fired, crowds clapped for exactly 62 seconds - the length of time it took for the liner to roll down the slipway in 1911.

The Titanic sank on her maiden transatlantic voyage 11 months after her launch, with the loss of more than 1,500 lives, when she struck an iceberg.

Among the invited guests at the commemoration were schoolchildren and representatives from the four other cities and towns directly connected to the Titanic story - Cherbourg in France, Cobh (formerly Queenstown) in Co Cork, Liverpool and Southampton.

The Harlandic and Queen's Victoria male voice choirs sang a number of hymns during the half-hour service close to the almost-complete £100 million Titanic visitors centre, which is set to open ahead of next year's centenary of the liner's sinking in 1912.

Earlier, a major new exhibition on the Titanic opened at the nearby Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, boasting some artefacts recovered from the liner that have never been put on public display before.

Descendants of many of the men who helped build the ship, some of whom sailed on the first voyage and died in the maritime disaster, attended the service.

Lord Mayor of Belfast, councillor Niall O Donnghaile, said Belfast's role in the Titanic story had been overlooked in the past.

"The Titanic story is probably one of the most fascinating, amazing, poignant, thought-provoking and absorbing tales from the last century, if not the last millennium," he said.

"For too long, Belfast's part in the Titanic story, and the role of the people of Belfast in bringing Titanic to life, has been neglected.

"Over the past few years, the city that gave birth to the ship, and many others, has finally and rightfully acknowledged her part in the tale, and today we are proud to celebrate the achievement, epitomised by this historic moment, and educate the world about our city's role in the Titanic story."